Untitled-1.jpeg
Untitled-1.jpeg

12" x 12"

Graphite & Charcoal on Gesso Board

Union Square Station

Untitled-2.jpeg, 2017
Untitled-2.jpeg, 2017

12" x 12"

Charcoal & Graphite on Gesso Board

Rose in the Abandoned Lot

Untitled-3.jpeg, 2017
Untitled-3.jpeg, 2017

12" x 12"

Charcoal & Graphite on Gesso Board

Susan Delgado

Hamza & Maamoul, 2017
Hamza & Maamoul, 2017

24" x 24"

Charcoal & Graphite on Gesso Board

Self-Portrait No. 1, 2017
Self-Portrait No. 1, 2017

24" x 24"

Charcoal & Graphite on Gesso Board

There is a point where individuals lose touch with their social connection, their adhesion to the people and system around them. Karl Marx referred to this estrangement as alienation. He argued that the type of work that people were subjected to under capitalism separated them from their production, and in turn their labor. But what is one’s goal in life if not to work? Like many German thinkers, Marx believed man’s essential meaning to be in its labor, in loving and fully realizing one’s work. But we have defaced that natural notion under industrialized systems. We become hollow shells, cogs in a grand machine; we lose the self, the very spirit that gives life meaning. There is no more creativity. It willows away as technology lessens laborers’ work which consequently pays less money. Life becomes a fight for survival just to regenerate ourselves and the individual is alienated. Prickly and conformist.

Self-Portrait No. 2, 2017
Self-Portrait No. 2, 2017

24" x 24"

Charcoal & Graphite on Gesso Board

Innovation has brought about the greatest shift in human society: from ones based on lineage and shared traditions to new ones based on the interdependence and specialization of the members of a society. However, these new organic societies, as Emile Durkheim describes, suffer from not being able to effectively regulate society, to draw all of a society’s members together under an effective regulative system. Without this, people feel unbounded. People as infinite vessels of desire will become overwhelmed by the possibilities and become lost and confused in the societies they reside. Durkheim referred to this notion as anomie. There is not enough societal glue to connect people because the current system of law and regulation is irrelevant in a new, updated, innovated society. Society is running off the rails and the individual is left behind. Stuck and melancholy.

Migraine Headache, 2016
Migraine Headache, 2016

18" x 24"

Computer Manipulation, Charcoal on Bristol

Nude Figure, 2016
Nude Figure, 2016

18" x 24"

Charcoal on Newsprint.

Nude Figure, March 2016
Nude Figure, March 2016

18" x 24"

Charcoal on Bristol

Arthur C. Danto's Bed, 2016
Arthur C. Danto's Bed, 2016

18" x 24"

Graphite on Bristol

“. . .In our narrative, at first only mimesis [imitation] was art, then several things were art but each tried to extinguish its competitors, and then, finally, it became apparent that there were no stylistic or philosophical constraints. There is no special way works of art have to be. And that is the present and, I should say, the final moment in the master narrative. It is the end of the story.” Danto believed that any expression is artistic expression and that that is the end of art—in response to Hegel’s concept of the end of art.

Plato’s Bed, 2016
Plato’s Bed, 2016

18" x 24"

Charcoal and graphite on bristol.

In the Republic, Plato says that art imitates the objects and events of ordinary life. In other words, a work of art is a copy of a copy of a Form. It is even more of an illusion than is ordinary experience. On this theory, works of art are at best entertainment, and at worst a dangerous delusion.

John Dewey’s Bed, 2016
John Dewey’s Bed, 2016

14" x 18"

Graphite on Gesso Board

Dewey believed art to be representative of experience. “… An experience in a product, one might say a bi-product, of continuous and cumulative interaction of an organic self with the world.”

Dark Glass, Page 1 (2014)
Dark Glass, Page 1 (2014)

18" x 24"

Graphite on Bristol

Winner of a 2015 New England Press Association Award.

Dark Glass, Page 2
Dark Glass, Page 2

18" x 24"

Graphite on bristol

Apocalypse, 2014
Apocalypse, 2014

18" x 24"

Charcoal and graphite on bristol.

Owl, 2014
Owl, 2014

8.5" x 11"

Graphite on cardstock.

Animals, 2016
Animals, 2016

Graphite and Charcoal

Untitled, 2013
Untitled, 2013

18" x 24"

Graphite on bristol

Window Study
Window Study

18" x 24"

Charcoal on Newsprint

Still Life, 2016
Still Life, 2016

18" x 24"

Charcoal on Newsprint

Nude Study, 2016
Nude Study, 2016

18" x 24"

Charcoal on bristol

Gaara Portrait, 2012
Gaara Portrait, 2012

8.5" x 11"

Oldie. Graphite on cardstock.

Untitled, 2014
Untitled, 2014

Ink in Sketchbook

Venus, 2014
Venus, 2014

18" x 24"

Charcoal on bristol

Untitled, 2014
Untitled, 2014

Ink in Sketchbook

Untitled-1.jpeg
Untitled-2.jpeg, 2017
Untitled-3.jpeg, 2017
Hamza & Maamoul, 2017
Self-Portrait No. 1, 2017
Self-Portrait No. 2, 2017
Migraine Headache, 2016
Nude Figure, 2016
Nude Figure, March 2016
Arthur C. Danto's Bed, 2016
Plato’s Bed, 2016
John Dewey’s Bed, 2016
Dark Glass, Page 1 (2014)
Dark Glass, Page 2
Apocalypse, 2014
Owl, 2014
Animals, 2016
Untitled, 2013
Window Study
Still Life, 2016
Nude Study, 2016
Gaara Portrait, 2012
Untitled, 2014
Venus, 2014
Untitled, 2014
Untitled-1.jpeg

12" x 12"

Graphite & Charcoal on Gesso Board

Union Square Station

Untitled-2.jpeg, 2017

12" x 12"

Charcoal & Graphite on Gesso Board

Rose in the Abandoned Lot

Untitled-3.jpeg, 2017

12" x 12"

Charcoal & Graphite on Gesso Board

Susan Delgado

Hamza & Maamoul, 2017

24" x 24"

Charcoal & Graphite on Gesso Board

Self-Portrait No. 1, 2017

24" x 24"

Charcoal & Graphite on Gesso Board

There is a point where individuals lose touch with their social connection, their adhesion to the people and system around them. Karl Marx referred to this estrangement as alienation. He argued that the type of work that people were subjected to under capitalism separated them from their production, and in turn their labor. But what is one’s goal in life if not to work? Like many German thinkers, Marx believed man’s essential meaning to be in its labor, in loving and fully realizing one’s work. But we have defaced that natural notion under industrialized systems. We become hollow shells, cogs in a grand machine; we lose the self, the very spirit that gives life meaning. There is no more creativity. It willows away as technology lessens laborers’ work which consequently pays less money. Life becomes a fight for survival just to regenerate ourselves and the individual is alienated. Prickly and conformist.

Self-Portrait No. 2, 2017

24" x 24"

Charcoal & Graphite on Gesso Board

Innovation has brought about the greatest shift in human society: from ones based on lineage and shared traditions to new ones based on the interdependence and specialization of the members of a society. However, these new organic societies, as Emile Durkheim describes, suffer from not being able to effectively regulate society, to draw all of a society’s members together under an effective regulative system. Without this, people feel unbounded. People as infinite vessels of desire will become overwhelmed by the possibilities and become lost and confused in the societies they reside. Durkheim referred to this notion as anomie. There is not enough societal glue to connect people because the current system of law and regulation is irrelevant in a new, updated, innovated society. Society is running off the rails and the individual is left behind. Stuck and melancholy.

Migraine Headache, 2016

18" x 24"

Computer Manipulation, Charcoal on Bristol

Nude Figure, 2016

18" x 24"

Charcoal on Newsprint.

Nude Figure, March 2016

18" x 24"

Charcoal on Bristol

Arthur C. Danto's Bed, 2016

18" x 24"

Graphite on Bristol

“. . .In our narrative, at first only mimesis [imitation] was art, then several things were art but each tried to extinguish its competitors, and then, finally, it became apparent that there were no stylistic or philosophical constraints. There is no special way works of art have to be. And that is the present and, I should say, the final moment in the master narrative. It is the end of the story.” Danto believed that any expression is artistic expression and that that is the end of art—in response to Hegel’s concept of the end of art.

Plato’s Bed, 2016

18" x 24"

Charcoal and graphite on bristol.

In the Republic, Plato says that art imitates the objects and events of ordinary life. In other words, a work of art is a copy of a copy of a Form. It is even more of an illusion than is ordinary experience. On this theory, works of art are at best entertainment, and at worst a dangerous delusion.

John Dewey’s Bed, 2016

14" x 18"

Graphite on Gesso Board

Dewey believed art to be representative of experience. “… An experience in a product, one might say a bi-product, of continuous and cumulative interaction of an organic self with the world.”

Dark Glass, Page 1 (2014)

18" x 24"

Graphite on Bristol

Winner of a 2015 New England Press Association Award.

Dark Glass, Page 2

18" x 24"

Graphite on bristol

Apocalypse, 2014

18" x 24"

Charcoal and graphite on bristol.

Owl, 2014

8.5" x 11"

Graphite on cardstock.

Animals, 2016

Graphite and Charcoal

Untitled, 2013

18" x 24"

Graphite on bristol

Window Study

18" x 24"

Charcoal on Newsprint

Still Life, 2016

18" x 24"

Charcoal on Newsprint

Nude Study, 2016

18" x 24"

Charcoal on bristol

Gaara Portrait, 2012

8.5" x 11"

Oldie. Graphite on cardstock.

Untitled, 2014

Ink in Sketchbook

Venus, 2014

18" x 24"

Charcoal on bristol

Untitled, 2014

Ink in Sketchbook

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